With a quantum object we determine whether it is a wave or a particle.

Physical reality depends on an observer - Comment on 2013 January 22

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Quantum objects such as photons simply have complementary properties – being a wave, being a particle – that can be observed singly, but never together. And what determines which guise an object adopts? Bohr laid out a first outline of an answer: we do. Look for a wave and that’s what you’ll see. Read more:

Why does physical reality depend on an observer? Because physical reality is created by this observer!

On this website this subject has been discussed quite often and repeatedly it has been stated that the results of research into quantum physics prove quite clearly the existence of the spiritual world.

Today now I read an article about research results of the previous year which prove Niels Bohr and the Copenhagen Interpretation right and Albert Einstein wrong.

I now bring some extracts from the article I read today:

 

Quantum Shadows

No waves. No particles. Reality is even stranger than we thought

Is material reality made of particles or waves? Take your pick.

Quantum physics had produced the startling insight that light – everything in the quantum world, in fact – has a dual character. Sometimes it acts as if made of discrete chunks of stuff that follows well-defined paths – particles. At other times, it adopts the more amorphous, space-filling guise of a wave.

Now, though, the experiment has been redone with a further quantum twist. And it’s probably time to abandon any pretence of understanding the outcome. Forget waves, forget particles, forget anything that’s one or the other. Reality is far more inscrutable than that.

For Niels Bohr, the great Danish pioneer of quantum physics, this "central mystery" was nothing less than a principle of the new theory, one he called the complementarity principle. Quantum objects such as photons simply have complementary properties – being a wave, being a particle – that can be observed singly, but never together. And what determines which guise an object adopts? Bohr laid out a first outline of an answer at a grand gathering of physicists at the Instituto Carducci on the shores of Lake Como in Italy in September 1927: we do. Look for a wave and that’s what you’ll see.

The idea that physical reality depends on an observer’s whim bothered the likes of Einstein no end.

Wave and particle behaviours really do seem to be two sides of one coin representing material reality.

The complementary principle is at the heart of the "Copenhagen interpretation" of quantum mechanics, named after Bohr’s home city, which essentially argues that we see a conflict in such results only because our minds, attuned as they are to a macroscopic, classically functioning cosmos, are not equipped to deal with the quantum world. "The Copenhagen interpretation, from the very beginning, didn’t demand any ‘realistic’ world view of the quantum system."

The outcomes of the latest experiments simply bear that out. "Particle" and "wave" are concepts we latch on to because they seem to correspond to guises of matter in our familiar, classical world. But attempting to describe true quantum reality with these or any other black-or-white concepts is an enterprise doomed to failure.

It’s a notion that takes us straight back into Plato’s cave.

In the ancient Greek philosopher’s allegory, prisoners shackled in a cave see only shadows of objects cast onto a wall, never the object itself. A cylinder, for example, might be seen as a rectangle or a circle, or anything in between. Something similar is happening with the basic building blocks of reality. "Sometimes the photon looks like a wave, sometimes like a particle, or like anything in between."

In reality, though, it is none of these things. What it is, though, we do not have the words or the concepts to express.

 

See
2012 Feb 02 – The nature and construction of matter
2012 Oct 28 – The simulation hypothesis

 

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