The absence of a connection to an organized religion is not the same as the absence of a religious belief or practice.

People who do not have a specific religious affiliation - Comment on 2012 December 9

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2012 December 9

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The "nones" that is shorthand for the growing number of Americans who do not have a specific religious affiliation. They now make up nearly 20 per cent of the country's population. Read more:

More than half a year ago I had 2012 May 21 Not church and there it was about the "nones" and today I read again about these nones.

On this website religion is most of the time described as something negative, as something what keeps men from really building up a relationship with God, and the advice is always given to have nothing to do with religion and with organized religion and with denominations and to renounce it, as such connections with clerics prevent the connection with God, and this tendency of people described here on this webpage, to discard affiliation with religion, is therefore a sign that men, that some men, really think about the difference between true spirituality and religious customs.

These "nones" do not just comprise spiritually interested men but also atheists und their grows indicates that an aggravation occurs of goats against sheep, exactly as it is expressed in the prophecies.

Here are some extracts:

 

Add This Group To Obama's Winning Coalition: 'Religiously Unaffiliated'

The growing number of voters not aligned with a specific religion helped President Obama overcome deficits with Protestants and Catholics in key swing states. The Pew Research Center calls this group "nones" - agnostics, atheist and those who define themselves simply as "religious" or "spiritual but not religious."

The big demographic story out of the 2012 presidential election may have been President Obama's domination of the Hispanic vote, and rightfully so.

But as we close the book on the election, it bears noting that another less obvious bloc of key swing state voters helped the president win a second term.

They're the "nones" - that's the Pew Research Center's shorthand for the growing number of American voters who don't have a specific religious affiliation. Some are agnostic, some atheist, but more than half define themselves as either "religious" or "spiritual but not religious," Pew found in a recent survey.

They are typically younger, more socially liberal than their forebears, vote Democratic, and now make up nearly 20 percent of the country's population. Exit polls suggest that 12 percent of voters on Election Day were counted as "religiously unaffiliated."

"This really is a striking development in American politics," says Gregory Smith of the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. "There's no question that the religiously unaffiliated are a very important, politically consequential group."

The religiously unaffiliated voters are almost as strongly Democratic as white evangelicals are Republican, polls show.

Election analysts have hashed over the gender gap and the marriage gap. They talked about Hispanic voters and gay voters. But it was the religiously unaffiliated voters, says Iowa-based pollster J Ann Selzer, who gave her one of the election season's big "aha" moments.

Nationally, Obama lost the Protestant vote by 15 points, won the Catholic vote by 2 points, and captured 70 percent of the "nones."

Pew took a deep dive into this dynamic earlier this year, and came up with some answers.

"Young people just now entering adulthood are not only significantly more religiously unaffiliated compared with their elders today," he says, but they are also more religiously unaffiliated than previous generations of young people.

He cautions, however, against conflating the "nones" with nonbelievers.

"Those two things are not the same," Smith says. The "nones" are certainly less religious than those who say they belong to a religious group, but many are also believers.

"The absence of a connection to an organized religion is not the same as the absence of a religious belief or practice," he says.

Pew has tracked their growth, and found that in 2010 about a quarter of those in the "millennial generation" defined themselves as religiously unaffiliated. That's up from the 20 percent of Gen X-ers who said they had no religious affiliation, and 13 percent of baby boomers who said the same.

 

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