The corpse will come to life – as a zombie.

Tokoloshes and how Zombies are made - Comment on 2012 October 23 (2)

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2012 October 23 (2)

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In Zulu mythology, some practitioners of bad medicine will raid the graveyard and exhume a freshly buried corpse. They then drag the corpse to a secluded area, where they work their medicine on it. The process involves a long nail or sharpened stake being driven into the skull of the corpse. In a few hours, the corpse will come to life. Except it won’t be a real person, but a zombie, which will then perform whatever chores are assigned to him – usually of a nefarious nature. Read more:

There was already a webpage about tokoloshes on this website, 2011 Nov 16 – Tokoloshe, and also one about zombies, 2012 Feb 25 (6) – Zombie-making explained by experts.

In the one about zombies it was about John Sibusiso Dlamini-Gcabashe claiming to be the late musician Khulekani "Mgqumeni" Khumalo and that ukuthwebula was responsible for the transformation.

Today now I read again about this case and I bring some excerpts:

 

Which brings me to the case of famous musician Khulekani "Mgqumeni" Mseleku-Khumalo. Renowned for his guitar and vocal prowess, he shocked fans and family when he died in 2009, leaving behind two customary-law wives and numerous children.

Then, in February this year, he woke from the dead.

Mgqumeni emerged "from the dead" and immediately went to the radio stations, telling a spellbinding tale: how he had been kidnapped by a traditional healer, who took him to a dark cave somewhere in Gauteng. In the cave, he was forced to eat soil mixed with cow’s milk. A malevolent-looking cow stood guard in the cave, watching his every move. The traditional healer proceeded to shave off his trademark dreadlocks. He then administered some potent medicine to the highly confused Mgqumeni.

As an aside, let me point out that, in Zulu mythology, some practitioners of bad medicine – abakhunkuli – will raid the graveyard and exhume a freshly buried corpse. They then drag the corpse to a secluded area, where they work their medicine on it. The process, called ukuthwebula or ukuthwetshulwa, involves a long nail or sharpened stake being driven into the skull of the corpse. In a few hours, the corpse will come to life. Except it won’t be a real person, but a zombie, which will then perform whatever chores are assigned to him – usually of a nefarious nature.

Back to Mgqumeni. The story of a resurrected Mgqumeni went viral in the social media. As expected, some saw it as a bad joke, while others were non-committal. "Let’s see him before we make up our minds," they said.

Having listened to Mgqumeni being interviewed on radio, curious fans started flocking to his childhood home in Nquthu, in KwaZulu Natal.

For his own safety, the family decided to keep him hidden in one of the huts, and fans were barred from seeing him. More people came – from Johannesburg, from Durban, from all over the subcontinent.

Over the next few days, members of the family would speak to the media, confirming that the man was indeed Mgqumeni.

His paternal grandfather, Hlalalimanzi Khumalo, confirmed that this was his grandson. His common law wives Nomkhosi Mbatha and Thembi Ntombela said that after seeing their husband and spending some time with him, they needed no further convincing that it was him.

And there appeared to be official confirmation. Colonel Vincent Mdunge, a KwaZulu-Natal provincial police spokesman said in an Ukhozi FM news bulletin that the police were sure the man was indeed the dead Mgqumeni. Ukhozi has more than six million listeners.

But the Mselekus, from his maternal side, were not so convinced.

At any rate, as the tale of the musician back from the dead spead, the sales of his records skyrocketed, according to reports.

The family then decided to stage a performance at which he would introduce himself to thousands of his fans, who had travelled from all over the country to see the miracle. There was a huge police presence on that day in February and more than 30 000 spectators.

However, a few days later, it emerged that the man was an imposter. What a creative bird! His identity was revealed as Sibusiso John Gcabashe. He was arrested. It has been claimed in court that he is a character of unremitting delinquence: there are rape and theft allegations against him.

Because the matter is now in court, I will not delve into the detail, but will go back to where I started.

It seems to me that this man currently before court – whoever he is - possibly colluded with some people who recognized the power of the Mgqumeni brand.

Secure in the knowledge that many of Mgqumeni’s fans were of the unsophisticated stripe – with a tendency to believe in life after death or the miraculous resurrection from the dead – Gcabashe became Mgqumeni himself.

However, what gave the story credence was that even relatives were confirming that he was the real article. For a moment, a belief in the resurrection of man was given new meaning. Maybe the relatives were complicit in the plan. That is for the court case to confirm and contextualise.

The famous singer’s fans and some friends were shocked and, possibly in their heart of hearts, thrilled that their idol had risen from the dead. Desperate people are easy to fool.

Gcabashe himself is not such a bad actor. He still maintains that he is Mgqumeni Khumalo. When he appeared in court this week, he said tokoloshes or zombies were bothering him in prison, and he asked to be allowed permission to use muti to ward them off.

 

Above we just read something about some practitioners of bad medicine and there are of course then also practitioners of good medicine, also called traditional healers, or sangomas. Here some excerpts from a news item from four days ago:

 

Sangoma sick note ruled valid

A woman who was "badly tormented by her ancestors" has to be re-instated in her post, even if she took a month's leave without her employer's permission, the Labour Appeal Court has ruled.

Three judges from the Labour Appeals Court delivered their verdict, saying the judgment was "something new".

Johannah Mmelodi, who had already worked for the Kievitskroon Country Estate for eight years, attended in her own free time a course to become a traditional healer.

After completing the course, she asked for a month's unpaid leave to attend another course, to become a sangoma.

Her employers turned down her request, and she attended the course regardless, but not before dropping off a sick note from a traditional healer at her employer's office.

The sick note stated that she was being "badly tormented by her ancestors".

The company appealed, and the Labour Appeals Court ruled in Mmelodi's favour, saying South Africa was a land of many cultures and that traditional Western culture could not be allowed to dominate the African culture of many of the country's inhabitants.

 

This is again a case were "sophisticated" man and "sophisticated" media allow themselves to write about sangomas, traditional healers and a person "badly tormented by her ancestors".

They give themselves permission to mention such things because of one thing: it was mentioned in court. Would it not have been mentioned in court, it would have been out of question – for them. But now they can speak and write about it.

In all four cases mentioned here, 2011 Nov 16 and 2012 Feb 25 (6) and the case of today and also the case from four days ago, the information appeared in the "sophisticated" media because the information was subject to court hearings. They, the courts, made the material kosher and allowed them, the media, to publish it.

Above we read, "Secure in the knowledge that many of Mgqumeni’s fans were of the unsophisticated stripe – with a tendency to believe in life after death or the miraculous resurrection from the dead – Gcabashe became Mgqumeni himself."

Here we see the mentality of the atheists and the materialists, the "sophisticated" media and their writers. It is mainly arrogance. And that causes them to speak derogatorily about the testimony and experience of another man.

A court would not be able to do so; a court is based on good judgement. There the testimony, and therefore the validity of experience, of a man has to be accepted, particularly when that man has a good reputation.

So instead of respecting a fellow human being, and respecting his experience and his word, they, the materialists and the atheists, use such court testimonies for their propaganda against the supernatural and therefore against God.

The only way truth can really get established at court is to hear witnesses, but the people who deny God are not interested in truth.

We just read about practitioners of bad medicine and practitioners of good medicine and that they are called traditional healers, or sangomas. Now the practitioners of bad medicine may also be called witch doctors and so-called "modern" doctors often operate the same way witch doctors operate. The difference is often only that the real witch doctor knows what he is doing while the "modern" doctor does not know what he is doing. Read about it in 216. Read this message; it will bring you a lot of insights into the world of witchcraft – and manipulation. And into the world of the times of the end.

 

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