A new scientific theory suggests that death is not the terminal event we think.

Does death exist? - Comment on 2012 May 23

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2012 May 23

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One well-known aspect of quantum physics is that certain observations cannot be predicted absolutely. Instead, there is a range of possible observations each with a different probability. There are an infinite number of universes, and everything that could possibly happen occurs in some universe. Death does not exist in any real sense in these scenarios. Read more:

Yesterday I read a message by Bertha Dudde, 2012 May 22 (3) – Hour of death and today, as I was still busy finalizing that entry, I read something that did not come from spiritual writings but from the writings of a scientist, a scientist of advanced cell technology.

Here now excerpts from it:

 

Does death exist?

Many of us fear death. We believe in death because we have been told we will die. We associate ourselves with the body, and we know that bodies die. But a new scientific theory suggests that death is not the terminal event we think.

Although individual bodies are destined to self-destruct, the “I” feeling is just a fountain of energy operating in the brain. But this energy doesn’t just go away at death.

One well-known aspect of quantum physics is that certain observations cannot be predicted absolutely. Instead, there is a range of possible observations each with a different probability. One mainstream explanation, the “many-worlds” interpretation, states that each of these possible observations corresponds to a different universe (the ‘multiverse’). A new scientific theory - called biocentrism - refines these ideas. There are an infinite number of universes, and everything that could possibly happen occurs in some universe. Death does not exist in any real sense in these scenarios. All possible universes exist simultaneously, regardless of what happens in any of them. Although individual bodies are destined to self-destruct, the alive feeling - the ‘Who am I?’ - is just a 20-watt fountain of energy operating in the brain. But this energy doesn’t go away at death. One of the surest axioms of science is that energy never dies; it can neither be created nor destroyed. But does this energy transcend from one world to the other?

Consider an experiment that was recently published in the journal Science showing that scientists could retroactively change something that had happened in the past. Particles had to decide how to behave when they hit a beam splitter. Later on, the experimenter could turn a second switch on or off. It turns out that what the observer decided at that point, determined what the particle did in the past. Regardless of the choice you, the observer, make, it is you who will experience the outcomes that will result. The linkages between these various histories and universes transcend our ordinary classical ideas of space and time. Think of the 20-watts of energy as simply holo-projecting either this or that result onto a screen. Whether you turn the second beam splitter on or off, it’s still the same battery or agent responsible for the projection.

According to Biocentrism, space and time are not the hard objects we think. Wave your hand through the air - if you take everything away, what’s left? Nothing. The same thing applies for time. You can’t see anything through the bone that surrounds your brain. Everything you see and experience right now is a whirl of information occurring in your mind. Space and time are simply the tools for putting everything together.

Death does not exist in a timeless, spaceless world. In the end, even Einstein admitted, “Now Besso” (an old friend) “has departed from this strange world a little ahead of me. That means nothing. People like us…know that the distinction between past, present, and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.” Immortality doesn’t mean a perpetual existence in time without end, but rather resides outside of time altogether.

 

Have a look at 219, there is also something about “retroactively change something that had happened in the past.”

Now on this website the writer, that is me, seems to have quite a bad opinion of scientists and expresses this quite often. Lately I am considering this and I am wondering if scientists are really as bad as I am portraying them or if the situation is not slightly different. Now this article from which the above is quoted comes from, is a publication that is not mainstream. In the last few days I looked up a couple of words and names in Wikipedia. Now this is the mainstream encyclopedia and the fanaticism which I found there with which materialism and atheism was propagated was obvious. And so it is with many mainstream publications. So there may be more genuine scientists around than I expected, but they find it may be difficult for them to get published. So the real culprits are may be the writers who write about scientific things and their editors and publishers. I have seen one publication where the science man quite proudly states his belief in evolution and that seems to indicate that it is more the publishers of scientific things that are the religious guys and less the actual scientists.

 

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