Time as we know it does not exist.

Many Kinds of Universes - Comment on 2010 September 9 (2)

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2010 September 9 (2)
Every celestial body has probably its own natural laws or states of consciousness, and they are probably all populated but this life might not be perceivable by our state of consciousness here on earth. Read more:

Today, on the 9th of September 2010, I read again something about the newest book by Stephen Hawking. The article makes remarks about the author, or rather the authors, and speaks about ‘Godmongering,’ ‘Mr. Hawking has … declared God pretty much dead,’ ’Mr. Hawking’s supposed jettisoning of God’ and ‘This book is provocative pop science, an exploration of the latest thinking about the origins of our universe.’ So the article is not very flattering when it speaks about the book and its authors but it also speaks of ‘an exploration of the latest thinking about the origins of our universe,’ and then some passages follow, which give some insights of this latest thinking of scientists about our universe and that reminded me of what I wrote on the 4th of September 2010.

So I am going to quote these passages from the article I read because they speak of similar things, which I touched, that every celestial body has probably its own natural laws or states of consciousness, and that they are probably all populated but that this life might not be perceivable by our state of consciousness here on earth and that when we, with this earth consciousness, come to the moon, we might just perceive an empty place and will not be aware of the beings there. But they also reminded me of things I had written about time and space and that our inability to know the past and to know the future is just based on our limited consciousness capacity, and that these limitation had not been there before our fall and that we will have again this unlimited capacity for consciousness when we manage to get out of our limitations and become light beings again.

So in the following passages other words for more and less the same things are used and we read about the ‘ultimate theory of everything’ and ‘great many universes’ and ‘multiple universes’ and ‘many of these universes would be quite different from ours’ and ‘form of life remotely like ours’ and ‘Our perceptions are limited and warped by the kind of lenses we see through’ and ’our universe doesn’t have just a single history, but every possible history, each with its own probability’ and ‘time as we know it does not exist’

So now follow these passages:

At its core “The Grand Design” is an examination of a relatively new candidate for the “ultimate theory of everything,” something called M-theory, itself an extension of string theory, which tries to reconcile general relativity and quantum mechanics. “M-theory is not a theory in the usual sense,” the authors write. “It is a whole family of different theories.” According to M-theory, “ours is not the only universe,” the authors say. “Instead M-theory predicts that a great many universes were created out of nothing.” The image that comes to mind here, others have written about M-theory, is of a God blowing soap bubbles.

But Mr. Hawking and Mr. Mlodinow assert that “their creation does not require the intervention of some supernatural being or god. Rather, these multiple universes arise naturally from physical law. They are a prediction of science.” Many of these universes would be quite different from ours, they add, and “quite unsuitable for the existence of any form of life,” or at least any form of life remotely like ours.

M-theory, if it is confirmed, would be “the unifying theory Einstein was hoping to find,” the authors write. But it’s a somewhat disappointing theory, a patchwork quilt rather than a fine, seamless garment.

To approach their thinking about M-theory, Mr. Hawking and Mr. Mlodinow first stroll leisurely through the history of scientific thinking about the nature of our universe, from Pythagoras to Descartes, and from Heisenberg to Feynman. They are often good at working up crisp mental images. They write about a city in Italy that, a few years ago, barred pet owners from keeping goldfish in curved bowls. Why? Because it is cruel, the city council argued, to give the fish “a distorted view of reality.”

We’re quite similar to those goldfish, the authors suggest. Our perceptions are limited and warped by the kind of lenses we see through, “the interpretive structure of our human brains.” Digging deeply into quantum physics, they argue that our universe “doesn’t have just a single history, but every possible history, each with its own probability.” We create history by observing it; it doesn’t create us. There’s plenty in “The Grand Design” that, if you are not a physicist or a mathematician, will sometimes hurt your head, especially the ideas about why time as we know it does not exist. As even Feynman once wrote, “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics.”

 

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